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Posted by: sls60 on Mar 25, 2013
Joseph Cusumano
Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, PSU

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
3:35pm - 4:25pm
114 EES Building
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 25, 2013
Professor Akhlesh Lakhtakia
A twist on thin-film technology may provide a way to optically detect and analyze multiple substances simultaneously, leading to quicker diagnostics in such industries as health care and homeland security, according to Penn State researchers.

One current optical-sensing technology can launch and guide a single light wave, called a surface-plasmon-polariton wave -- SPP wave -- that travels along the flat interface of the sample to be analyzed and a metal film. The SPP wave is launched by sending a light beam through a prism to the other face of the metal film. A photon detector eventually collects the beam that was reflected back into the prism. Any change in the optical properties of the sample critically alters the reflected beam.

The detector records this alteration, which analysts can then use as an optical fingerprint to help them identify the changes in the chemical composition of the sample, according to Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Charles Godfrey Binder Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics.

However, because the technology allows for only one SPP wave of a certain frequency to be guided through the device, the properties of only one substance can be analyzed for each sensor, said Lakhtakia, who worked with Stephen Swiontek and Drew Pulsifer, both doctoral students in engineering science and mechanics.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 21, 2013
Shayne Bement, undergraduate student in Engineering Science, will travel to Washinton, D.C. in late March to attend Open 2013 - National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators Alliance (NCIIA). While at the conference, Shayne will present his Open Minds Exhibition Project. To learn more about the conference, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 20, 2013
Dr. Michael Lanagan, Professor in Engineering Science and Mechanics, was recently highlighted in a recent issue of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) magazine on his work with Reconfigurable Antennas. Reconfigurable antennas change polarization, operating frequency, or far-field pattern in order to cope with changing system parameters. This paper reviews some of the past and current technology applicable to reconfigurable antennas with several examples of implementations. Mechanically movable parts and arrays are discused, as well as more recent semiconductor-component and turnable-material technologies applicable to reconfigurable antennas.
Posted by: sls60 on Mar 18, 2013
Michael Janik
Department of Chemical Engineering, PSU

Wednesday, March 27, 2013
3:35pm - 4:25pm
114 EES Building
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 15, 2013
Isin Dizvay, graduate student in Engineering Science and Mechanics, under the advising of Professor Barbara Shaw, will travel to Orlando, Florida in March to attend the National Association of County Engineers (NACE) 2013 conference. While at the meeting, Isin will present a poster in the student poster competition, share and network with other graduate students, professors and industry professionals to advance research ideas and future opportunities. To learn more about the NACE 2013 meeting, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 15, 2013
Daniel Cook, graduate student in Engineering Science and Mechanics, under the advising of Professor Barbara Shaw, will travel to Orlando, Florida in March to attend the National Association of County Engineers (NACE) 2013 conference. While at the meeting, Daniel will present a poster in the student poster competition, share and network with other graduate students, professors and industry professionals to advance research ideas and future opportunities. To learn more about the NACE 2013 meeting, please visit their website.
Posted by: sls60 on Mar 11, 2013
Irina Mociolu
Department of Physics, PSU

Wednesday, March 20, 2013
3;35pm - 4:25pm
114 EES Building
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 10, 2013
Professor Osama Awadelkarim
Dr. Osama Awadelkarim, Professor in Engineering Science and Mechanics, will travel to Medellin, Columni in March to serve as an invited speaker in the Columbia-U.S. Workshop on Nanotechnology. To learn more about the workshop, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 7, 2013
Drew Pulsifer, graduate student in Engineering Science and Mechanics, under the advising of Professor Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Charles Godfrey Binder Professor in Engineering Science and Mechanics, will travel in early March to San Diego, California. While on travel, Drew will attend the Bioinspiration, biomimetics, and Bioreplication III technical conference of the SPIE: Smart Structures/NDE Symposium. Drew’s attendance at the conference will allow him to present a paper entitled: Progress toward visual decoys to trap the male emerald ash borer. The paper and presentation describe the progress made by Penn State researchers to develop an artificial decoy to lure male emerald ash borers which can be used as a lure in a trap that could help limit the spread of this destructive invasive species. To learn more about the conference, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 2, 2013
Hui Yang, graduate student in Engineering Science and Mechanics, under the advising of Professor Sulin Zhang will travel to San Antonio, Texas to attend and present at The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS) 2013. While attending the conference, Hui will present a paper entitled Mechanics of Lithiation in Silicon. Hui’s multiscale model that couples atomistic simulations with continuum chemo-mechanics to study the phase transformation stress generation, large plastic flow, damage evolution and failure in lithiated Silicon will be presented. The study will shed light on the lithiation-mediated degradation in nanostructured electrodes. The multiscale modeling framework is generic and will provide a basis for simulating the morphological evolution, stress generation, and failure in high-capacity electrodes for the next-generation lithium-ion batteries. To learn more about the conference, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 2, 2013
Alineza Ostadhossein, graduate student in Engineering Science and Mechanics, under the advising of Professor Sulin Zhang, will travel in early March to San Antonio, Texas to attend The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) 2013. While at the conference, Alineza will present a paper entitled Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crack Propagation in Silicon Nanowires/Effect of Lithiation. Further, Lithium ion batteries (LIBS) are widely used to power devices for portable electronics. Silicon represents one of the most promising anode materials for the next generation of LIBS. The effect of lithiation will be examined on the critical griffith’s load and strain energy distributions during crack propagation of Silicon NWs. To learn more about the conference, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 2, 2013
Professor Akhlesh Lakhtakia
Dr. Akhlesh Lakhtakia, Charles Godfrey Binder Professor in Engineering Science and Mechanics, will travel to San Diego, California in early March to co-chair the SPIE Conference. The conference is entitled Bioinspiration, Biomimetics, and Bioreplication III. To learn more, please visit their website.
Posted by: jml43 on Mar 1, 2013
Professor Steven Schiff
Models of the human brain, patterned on engineering control theory, may some day help researchers control such neurological diseases as epilepsy, Parkinson's and migraines, according to a Penn State researcher who is using mathematical models of neuron networks from which more complex brain models emerge.

"The dual concepts of observability and controlability have been considered one of the most important developments in mathematics of the 20th century," said Steven J. Schiff, the Brush Chair Professor of Engineering and director of the Penn State Center for Neural Engineering. "Observability and controlability theorems essentially state that if you can observe and reconstruct a system's variables, you may be able to optimally control it. Incredibly, these theoretical concepts have been largely absent in the observation and control of complex biological systems."

Those engineering concepts were originally designed for simple linear phenomena, but were later revised to apply to non-linear systems. Such things as robotic navigation, automated aircraft landings, climate models and the human brain all require non-linear models and methods.