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CNE Seminars

Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Apr 19, 2007
CNE Seminar

Speaker: Dr. Jiping He, Professor of Bioengineering at Arizona State University, Tempe

on Thursday, April 26, 2007
Where: 108 Wartik Lab
Time: 4:00 PM

Host: Dr. Steven Schiff, Director, Center for Neural Engineering

Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Dec 5, 2006
Speaker: Tarik Haydar, Children's National Medical Center and George Washington University

Where: S-5 Osmond Laboratory

Time: 10:00 AM

host: Steven Schiff, Departments of Neurosurgery
Department of Engineering Sciences and Mechanics, Physics
(863-4210 or 321-4884)
Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Nov 27, 2006
Speaker: Dr. Diego Contreras of the University of Pennsylvania
When: Wednesday, November 29, 2006
Time: 10:00 AM
Where: S-5 Osmond Building
Host: Dr. Steven J. Schiff of the Center for Neural Engineering

Dr. Contreras is one of the world's leaders on the encoding of
information in the thalamus and visual system, somatosensory cortex,
as well as the physiology of epileptic seizures. He is a systems
physiologist who performs cutting edge optical imaging, computational
neuroscience, and difficult in vivo electrophysiology of single cells.

Please join Dr. Contreras for lunch afterwards if interested.

[Note: This seminar will be available as an open broadcast to the
Penn State Community at:
https://breeze.psu.edu/neuralengineeringseminar4/
You will need a sound card and speakers to view this properly.
We will have this broadcast in room H4151 at Hershey as well.]
Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Nov 8, 2006
Wednesday, November 15, 2006 - 10-11 AM, S-5 Osmond Building

Speaker: Jian-young Wu, Professor, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University in Washington, DC

Dr. Wu is one of the world's leaders in optical imaging of the nervous system. His work is of broad interest to the Science and Engineering community at Penn State.

NOTE: This seminar will be available as an open broadcast to the Penn State community at:

https://breeze.psu.edu/neuralengineeringseminar3/

You will need a sound card and speakers to view this properly. We are working to improve the audio. This broadcast will be available in room H4151 at Hershey.

Please join Dr. Wu for lunch afterwards, if interested.

Future Neural Engineering Seminar Speakers:

Diego Contreras, Univesity of Pennsylvania, November 29, 2006
Tarik Haydar, Children's National Medical Center/George Washington University, December 13
Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Oct 26, 2006
November 1, 2006, 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM in S-5 Osmond Building

Speaker: John A. White, Ph.D., Chair ad interim, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University

Note: This seminar will be available as an open broadcast to the Penn State community at:

https://breeze.psu.edu/neuralengineeringseminar2/

You will need a sound card and speakers to view this properly. We will have this broadcast in room H4151 at Hershey.

Dr. White is one of the world's leaders in biomedical engineering, and is an expert on the experimental real time dynamic clamping of neurons, and the computational and theoretical aspects of synchrony between neurons. His work is of broad interest to the Science and Engineering community at Penn State.

Abstract:

The hippocampal formation is crucial for remembering epidodes in one's life, and evidence suggests that synchronous activity throughout the hippocampus is essential for the mnemonic functions of this brain structure. We have studied the mechanisms of synchronization using electrophysiological and computational methods. More recently, we have exploited methods for introducing real-time control in cellular electrophysiology. These techniques allow us to "knock in" virtual ion channels that can be controlled with great mathematical precision, and to immerse biological neurons in real-time, virtual neuronal networks. These manipulations allow us to test computationally-based hypotheses in living cells. From this work, I will discuss which properties of single cells seem crucial for coherent activity in the hippocampal formation. I will also discuss work on the consequences of precise spike timing in neuronal network function.

Future Neural Engineering Seminar Speakers:

November 15 - Jian-Young Wu of Georgetown University

November 29 - Diego Contreras, University of Pennsylvania,

December 13 - Tarik Haydar, Childen's National Medical Center/George Washington University

Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Oct 17, 2006
Speaker: Dr. Cameron C. McIntyre, Ph.D., Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Biomedical Engineering

Abstract:

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. DBS also shows promise in the treatment of epilepsy, obsessive-compulsive disorder, tourette syndrome, and major depression. While clinically successful, understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms of action of DBS remains elusive and from an engineering perspective, it is presently unclear what electrode designs and stimulation strategies are optimal for maximum therapeutic benefit. Through collaborative interaction with neurophysiologists, neurologists, and neurosurgeons our group uses detailed computer models and experimental investigation to enhance our understanding of the effects of DBS. This talk will focus on how we are translating our scientific knowledge into technologies that improve clinical care.

Future Neural Engineering Seminar Speakers:

John White, Boston University---November 1, 2006

Jian-Young Wu, Georgetown University---November 15, 2006

Diego Contreras, University of Pennsylvania---November 29, 2006

Tarik Haydar, Children's National Medical Center/ George Washington University---December 13, 2006

Watch for more information!

Category: CNE Seminars
Posted by: jeb4 on Oct 6, 2006
The Center for Neural Engineering will be hosting numerous seminars throughout the semester. Please stay tuned for notices. For convenience select CNE seminars when reading the What's New page.

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