Metals References

Annotated Bibliography

Aluminum Design Manual (1994), Aluminum Association, Washington D.C.

This source gives a brief description of the properties of aluminum and its alloys. It has good tables that summarize all the characteristics of the different alloys, including mechanical properties and product forms.

Bauccio, Michael (1993) ASM Metals Reference Book 3rd ed., ASM International, Materials Park.

This source has tables that summarize the properties and applications of metals, including mechanical properties and the designation systems.

Boyer, Howard and Timothy L. Gall (1985) Metals Handbook, American Society For Metals, Materials Park.

This source has tables that summarize the properties and applications of metals, including mechanical properties and the designation systems.

Davis, J.R. (1996) Carbon and Alloy Steels, ASM International, Materials Park.

This source has tables that summarize the properties and applications of metals, including mechanical properties and the designation systems.

Davis, J.R. (1993) Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys, ASM International, Materials Park.

This book has a good summary of aluminum, including the designation systems. It has good tables that summarize the characteristics and applications of aluminum, including mechanical properties.

Horath, Larry (1995) Fundamentals of Materials Science for Technologists, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs.

Mott, Robert L. (1996) Applied Strength of Materials, 3rd. ed., Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs.

Sharp, Maurice L. (1993) Behavior and Design of Aluminum Structures, McGraw-Hill, Inc., New York.

This book gives a good summary of the history and characteristics of aluminum and it's alloys, including their designation and temper systems. There is a table, which includes the most common aluminum alloys, categorized by application and product form, that is very helpful (pp. 30-31). It also has a section on designing for efficiency, which includes similarities and differences between steel and aluminum, designing for minimum weight, manufacturing, and complete life cycle.


This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0633602. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recomendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).


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